Your mileage has certainly become a much more interesting topic in recent times. This is not because folks have just developed a new love for auto mechanics; it has to do with how much of our monthly spend goes to gas. The price of gas is still near all time highs and does not show any signs of dropping low enough to really make a difference. I will give you a few tips that will help you maximize your gas mileage.

You can get better gas mileage by changing your oil at regular intervals. If you’ve been putting off this important chore indefinitely you’ve built a drain on your finances without knowing. Time is money. But the time spent on changing your oil is saved at the gas station. Always remember what you’re losing otherwise. This will motivate you to do your oils as frequently as necessary.

The next thing that can help you improve your mileage is the attention you give to your tires. The condition of your tires affects your fuel use. Under inflated tires lower your gas mileage by 0.4 for every one pound of drop in pressure of all four tires. This means that if you’re under inflated by as much as 5 pounds you are losing as much as 2% in your fuel economy.

Still on tires, if your tires are not properly aligned they will drag and not roll freely. This also will increase fuel consumption. So, it’s a good idea to ensure your tires are properly aligned. Generally make sure your tires have all the care they require. You’ll get better mileage for that.

The more load you have on your car, the less your gas mileage. This means that you must get rid of stuff that are of no practical use to you on a drive. Check your trunk, you’ll be surprised how much has accumulated over time. Remove them and keep only the essentials.

A warm engine saves more fuel than a cool engine. How can you take advantage of this fact? Simple. Try as much as possible to combine every bit of activity that involves driving around into one or less drives. You can work out mutual arrangements with friends that will help you maximize this option.

There are features you can use on the highway to improve your gas mileage. They are the cruise control and the overdrive. The first helps you maintain your speed while the other provides an extra gear for high speeds.

Driving at speeds above 60km/h lower you gas mileage. So drive at slower speeds wherever you can.
Go ahead and make sure you try all these tips and you’ll improve your gas mileage considerably.

Gregg Hall
http://www.articlesbase.com/automotive-articles/some-simple-but-effective-automotive-maintenance-tips-to-help-improve-your-gas-mileage-66434.html


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Some Simple But Effective Automotive Maintenance Tips To Help Improve Your Gas Mileage
Some Simple But Effective Automotive Maintenance Tips To Help Improve Your Gas Mileage
Auto Education
Auto Repair Savings And My Special Links
New Car Buying Tips How To Buy A New Car Below Invoice Price


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Today’s vehicles are equipped with an array of warning lights. Of course we’re all familiar will the seat belt warning and the door ajar indicator; however, with the automotive industry’s technological advancements there are a number of warning lights that can be quite alarming.

Following is a Question and Answer Guide on some of the more common Warning Light concerns. Note: due to the frequency of the Check Engine Warning Light, it has a section all its own. Visit www.repairtrust.com/check.html.

1) SRS Light (Supplemental Restraint System): the supplemental restraint system is your Airbag System. It may incorporate a variety of active, passive, and even pre-safe technology depending on the vehicle. Given that the SRS System is a safety system, it is well monitored with numerous sensors and automatic self-tests. The slightest malfunction in this system illuminates the SRS light.

“Can the vehicle be driven with an SRS Light on?” Yes, at the owner’s risk. There are thousands of vehicles on the road without SRS technology.

“Is the airbag going to blow up?” It’s unlikely. When the SRS Light is on the system is inoperative.

2) ABS Lights: The Anti-Lock Brake System Warning Light is another common occurrence in today’s vehicles. The ABS system helps to keep you from skidding out of control during braking by limiting your wheels from locking up/skidding.

The ABS system is often integrated with traction control and stability systems, all of which are designed to keep you safe during panic stops, wheel slippage, and handling.

“Do I need brakes?” You might, but that’s not why the ABS Light is on. The ABS Warning System does not monitor disc brake pad or disc brake rotor wear (see the Padlight Warning section below)

“Can the vehicle be driven?” Like the SRS system, the vehicle can be driven at the owner’s risk as there are many vehicles still on the market without the enhanced safety features of ABS.

“Why is my ABS light on? How do I reset the ABS Light?” These are simple questions with a multitude of answers depending on the vehicle in question. For a QUICK and FREE solution, follow the information and guidelines for Resetting Check Engine Light, and apply them to your ABS light.

3) Low Coolant Light: The Low Coolant Light will come on when the coolant drops below the coolant level sensorgenerally one to two quarts. If this light is on, there are two primary possibilities. The most common is a coolant leak. The other is an electrical fault in the warning lamp circuit. Have them checked out.

“Can it be driven?” If there are no major leaks, the vehicle is not overheating (and does not start to overheat), and there is still some evidence of coolant in the overflow bottle, it can be driven. If you can see coolant leaking on the groundtow it. When in doubt, always tow it!

4) Red Oil Light On: Stop driving immediately and shut the engine off! If a Red Oil Warning Light comes on PAY ATTENTION.

The best case scenario is that your engine oil is a little low. The second best case scenario is that there is an electrical issue with the Oil Level Warning System circuit.

First, follow your owners’ manual’s instructions to check your oil. If low, add as recommendedmake sure you don’t see it dripping or pouring out on the ground, which would indicate a “major” engine leak.

If the oil is not low and your engine is making ticking, knocking, or unusual noises, Tow it!

If everything appears ok, and you’re a bit of a gambler, it may just be an issue with the warning lamp circuit. In this case, get your vehicle checked out at your earliest convenience.

The worst case scenario is internal engine damage.

Note: many of today’s vehicles have very sensitive and sophisticated Oil Level Warning Systems. You may be alerted of oil level too high, or oil level too low. Again, refer to your owners’ manual’s instructions.

So whether it’s a 1993 Ford Aerostar Check Oil Light, or a question of “Why does oil light flash in Saab automobile,” PAY ATTENTION!

5) Red Brake Warning Lights: Generally, Red Warning Lights mean DANGER. In the case of a Red Brake Warning Light, there may be a hydraulic brake fluid leak. If the brake pedal feels abnormal or spongydon’t driveTow It!

“Can I drive it?” If the car is stopping ok, and you’re a gambler, go ahead. If the brake pedal feels different than usual, or if the vehicle is not stopping properly, don’t drive it!

Note: make sure that your emergency brake is not on or partially engaged, as this will illuminate a Red Brake Warning Light.

6) Yellow Brake Warning Light (Padlight): This is an early warning system for brake pad wear. Essentially, as your disc brake pads wear down, at a certain point a sensor is tripped to alert you that you will need brakes soon.

“Can I drive the vehicle, and for how long?” Yes, you can continue to drive. How long depends on your driving style. City drivers (city driving is generally harder on brakes due to the constant stop and go) will likely need their brakes addressed before someone who does primarily highway driving.

“Will I do more damage to the brakes?” Depending on how long you continue to drive you could conceivably wear your disc brake pads down to the metal backing plate, which could then damage your disc brake rotors and, in rare cases, the disc brake calipers. However, with many of today’s brake systems, the replacement of the disc brake rotors along with the disc brake pads is required or strongly recommended.

Important: It is better to have your brakes checked early to increase the possibility of saving money by not having to replace the rotors. However, many of today’s brake disc pads and rotors require replacement not due to wear, but due to rust and corrosion; thus rotor replacement is often necessary anyway. Brake calipers rarely need replacing during regular brake work.

7) Air Suspension Lights (Airmatic, Air Ride, Hydraulic Suspensions): Suspension Warning Lights illuminate when the suspension’s monitoring system has detected a fault. Often there is a leakeither air or hydraulic fluid.

“Can I drive it?” Sometimes. But if the suspension is lower than usual, and/or the vehicle just doesn’t feel rightTow It! Extensive damage could result if the suspension drops too low while driving.

Note: air suspension system repairs are best left to the best, state-of-the-art service center you can find, preferably a dealership.

8) Tire Pressure Warning Light: This recent technological development causes quite a bit of confusion. Put simply, if your tire is getting low on air, your car lets you know via sensors mounted in various places depending on the model.

“What is the low tire pressure warning light reset procedure?” Sometimes the reset procedure is as simple as pressing a button. Other times one has to set the tire pressures, recalibrate the on-board computer, genuflect and cross two fingers. Check your owners’ manual or call a specialist or dealer.

Note: Local shops and franchises (for the most part) lack familiarity with Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems given that this is a fairly recent technological development. You can refer to How to Reset Check Engine Light, and follow the tips, and suggestions for getting it reset.

9) Emission Warning Light: This light is similar to the Check Engine Light. Many European models such as Volvos have this type of Warning System. It’s essentially letting you know that an emissions component has failed or detected a fault. Follow the Check Engine Light information and tips to address this particular warning light.

Note: make sure you take it to a shop equipped to handle emissions work.

10) Resetting Oil Lights (Oil Change Warning Lamps): Whether it’s a Toyota Oil Light Procedure, an Oil Change Warning Light Reset 2005 GMC Envoy, or the process to Reset 1999 M3 Oil Service Light, all require a specific course of action.

Most owners’ manuals have this information. You should find it under maintenance or oil service. You can also call your local mechanic, who resets oil service lights everyday on a variety of models. A dealership will certainly have the information; however, finding someone in a dealership who can translate it effectively may be difficult.

If the above fails, see the process for Resetting Check Engine Light.

Note: several European models require special tools to reset the oil service light, thus it’s best to call or visit a specialist or dealer.

Note: This information is not a substitute for your vehicle’s owners’ manual. It is meant to be a general guide. Always refer to manufacturer vehicle-specific guidelines.

Note: PAY ATTENTION to how you are billed for any of the above warning concerns. Because of their technical nature they can get “unnecessarily” very pricy, quickly.

Theodore Olson
http://www.articlesbase.com/automotive-articles/car-warning-lights-is-my-car-going-to-blow-up-myths-60350.html


I've selected some sites that might be of interest to you regarding auto maintenance and repair tips for Marietta drivers.

Car Warning Lights: Is My Car Going To Blow Up? Myths
Car Warning Lights: Is My Car Going To Blow Up? Myths
Auto Education
Do it Yourself Automobile Repair Manuals - Mitchell 1 DIY
A Checklist for Auto Repair Shops - Tips for Auto Repair ... - NEWMOA


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Learning a little more about how to better care for your vehicles is a good idea for any number of reasons. It allows you to know if an unscrupulous mechanic is attempting to gouge you on your repairs – and that will save you money. It can prevent you from making unnecessary repairs – and that will save you money. It can help you locate a problem and fix it early, thus saving more money – sometimes a whole lot of money. It allows you to be more independent in an era where people are entirely too dependent on others to survive.

We need to get started now, so that we have time to cover everything…

First, do a visual check of your vehicle. The following will assist you in where to look, and for what:

Eric Scribener
http://www.articlesbase.com/automotive-articles/shade-tree-automotive-diagnostics-and-care-part-i-see-no-evil-83174.html


I've selected some sites that might be of interest to you regarding auto maintenance and repair tips for Marietta drivers.

Shade Tree Automotive Diagnostics And Care - Part I - See No Evil
Shade Tree Automotive Diagnostics And Care - Part I - See No Evil
Auto Maintenance Tips From Car Talk
Free Auto Repair HelpAuto Repair
New Car Buying Tips How To Buy A New Car Below Invoice Price


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More info: http://www.metacog.com

Duration : 0:9:21

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I've selected some sites that might be of interest to you regarding auto maintenance and repair tips for Marietta drivers.


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volvo
Car Repair Tips | Auto Repair Video Site
A Checklist for Auto Repair Shops - Tips for Auto Repair ... - NEWMOA
Auto Repair Advice Car Reviews & Values - DriverSide


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More info: http://www.metacog.com

Duration : 0:9:41

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volvo
Mechanics Files | Car Talk
Free Online Auto Repair Guide & Tips
Automotive Troubleshooting


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These are the last 3 laps of the 1998 NAPA Auto Care 500 from the MArtinsville Speedway. Ricky Rudd whom over time has gotten the name “iron man”. On a Sunday afternoon at Martinsville Rudd over came the heat, the blisters, and the dehydration to win for the 16th straight season in the Winston Cup series. Rudd who had a new helmet with a new cooling system failed on the 1st lap of the event made the car crazy hot and very uncomfterble. Ricky who also never won a race in 1998 up until this point was hungry. He won this race and to this day the closest owner/driver to win a race since Alan Kulwiki.

Duration : 0:2:29

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Rudd
Rudd
Real Auto Repair Help and Advice From a Real Mechanic
Auto Body Shops & Auto Repair Shops in Phoenix AZ & Tucson AZ ...
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I was actually a passenger in a car that was having an active
Oil Leak. The driver knew what was happening, and was warned to
pull to the side of the road and call a tow truck, but she
wanted to try to make it home. Unfortunately, she didn’t. The
engine seized up, never to run again. What a foolish and costly
mistake.

The simple fact is that the engine in your car cannot run
without lubrication from oil. Heat and friction would, as
illustrated in the case above, cause the engine to come to a
full halt.

When I bought a new car many years ago and took it in for it’s
first Oil Change the mechanic said to me that if I kept the oil
changed I’d get 200,000 miles out of the engine. He was right. I
faithfully changed the oil every 3,000 miles and at 189,000
miles had to say goodbye to my faithful friend, not due to
engine trouble, but due to a rusting frame. He also noticed that
the oil filter that was on my vehicle from the manufacturer was
larger than actually called for. He said this wasn’t a bad idea.
A larger amount of oil meant more flowing through the engine
cooling and lubricating and cleaning the engine. When I started
to change the oil myself I kept on using the larger oil filter.

Most new cars today don’t call for their oil to be changed quite
as often as every 3,000 miles. Generally it’s 5,000 and some
even more. I like to have the oil in my car changed at least
every 5,000 miles. That oil change is actually more than an oil
change. The technician gets to give your car a once over,
checking belts and hoses and other vital fluids. Generally we
don’t even think about these things. It’s much easier to change
a worn belt while your car is in the shop than be broken down on
the side of the road waiting for a tow truck.

The simple act of changing the oil in your car may be the best
thing you can do to protect your car, and your investment in it

Jeff Slokum
http://www.articlesbase.com/automotive-articles/oil-the-lifeblood-of-your-car-3069.html


I've selected some sites that might be of interest to you regarding auto maintenance and repair tips for Marietta drivers.

Oil - The Lifeblood Of Your Car
Oil - The Lifeblood Of Your Car
Auto Repair Advice Car Reviews & Values - DriverSide
Auto repair tips
Automotive Care Home Improvement Tools DIY Tips - Popular ...


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Learning a little more about how to better care for your vehicles is a good idea for any number of reasons. It allows you to know if an unscrupulous mechanic is attempting to gouge you on your repairs – and that will save you money. It can prevent you from making unnecessary repairs – and that will save you money. It can help you locate a problem and fix it early, thus saving more money – sometimes a whole lot of money. It allows you to be more independent in an era where people are entirely too dependent on others to survive.

We need to get started now, so that we have time to cover everything…

Some people are incredibly sensitive to the sounds their vehicles make. This is especially true of motorcyclists, those who refurbish vintage automobiles, and experienced mechanics. It’s a very worthwhile skill to develop. There are mechanics who can listen to a running car engine and tell if the timing is slightly off, or the injectors are not operating properly. While this is a very neat thing to be able to do, you do not have to elevate your listening skills to that lofty place in order to get benefits from listening to your vehicle.

Listen To the Engine
(This is best done in relatively quiet surroundings until you get really good at it.) Open up the hood of your vehicle’s engine compartment. If necessary on your model, be sure to use the metal rod to lock the hood in the upright/open position. Now, start your engine. Allow the engine to run for 30-60 seconds before you start listening too hard. Also, there are many moving parts inside of engine compartments, don’t wear loose clothing, and mind all your fingers and hair! Safety first.

A brief word about engine sounds…
All engines make sounds. Some sound like jets, and other have constant clicking noises, or humming, or clattering. Which sounds are consistently made, and are okay, are unique to your specific vehicle’s engine. The point being, don’t be alarmed the first time you really take a good listen to your engine. You’ll quickly learn the sounds that are okay, and the ones that are not.

You’re going to listen to your engine from three different positions: 1) Directly in front of the car. 2) On the left (driver’s side) side of the engine compartment. 3) On the right (passenger’s side) side of the engine compartment. I like to start I like to start on the left – right in front of the driver’s door.

Lean over the engine compartment (again – be careful with clothing, hair, and appendages) and listen carefully. Try closing your eyes to heighten your hearing. Listen for things that don’t sound ‘right.’ Such things might include: clattering, metal rubbing metal, clanging, and squeaks. If you hear such a thing, open your eyes and try to focus in on it – moving the position of your head and ears as your track the sound to its source. Repeat this process at all three positions previously described.

This method of checking your engine can reveal loose caps, loose fan belts, loose fans, missing bolts, nuts, and many other things. Correct what you are able to, and have anything else dealt with by a service technician. Don’t put your hands into your engine compartment to tighten something or check something while it is running. If you notice that the stays on the overflow tube are loose and rattling, turn off the engine before tightening.

Driving your car for a short distance over a good road with the radio and air conditioning off and the windows down is a good way to hear some other sounds. Clattering might mean you have a lug nut that came off, and it’s stuck inside the hubcap. A metal-rubbing-metal sound may be a stuck brake.

The last listening project/technique is the best – or at least so people tell me. This one requires a willing and able assistant. The two of you climb into the vehicle together – you drive, the assistant rides shotgun. The assistant will require four things: some WD-40, a notepad, a small can of 3-in-1 oil, and a good rag. Head for a road that isn’t so smooth, and simply drive along. The assistant listens for those irritating squeaks, squeals, and rattles.

The assistant should move around inside the vehicle, focusing on the sounds to locate their sources. One of the two lubricants will fix almost any squeaking – and the rag ensures a nice, tidy application of the chosen lubricant. Some things, such as loose or missing screws or bolts, should be recorded on the notepad for maintenance or repair later, when you get back home to the tools. You won’t believe how quiet your cockpit becomes after you perform this process once or twice.

Okay, you’ve completed another step in becoming a full-fledged automotive diagnostician – or something like that, anyway. You’ve definitely gotten your vehicle in much better condition, and you should have learned a thing or two. Check out Part I – See No Evil, and Part III – Smell No Evil.

Eric Scribener
http://www.articlesbase.com/automotive-articles/shade-tree-automotive-diagnostics-and-care-part-ii-hear-no-evil-83175.html


I've selected some sites that might be of interest to you regarding auto maintenance and repair tips for Marietta drivers.

Shade Tree Automotive Diagnostics And Care - Part Ii - Hear No Evil
Shade Tree Automotive Diagnostics And Care - Part Ii - Hear No Evil
DIY Auto Repair Help - Car Maintenance Troubleshooting How To ...
New Car Buying Tips How To Buy A New Car Below Invoice Price
Go Green - Auto Repair Vallejo


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How to change your oil

July 29, 2009

The Backyard Mechanics show how to perform a basic Oil Change

Duration : 0:5:17

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oil
oil
Tips for Engine Light Diagnosis at Home - YouFixCars.com
Free Auto Repair HelpAuto Repair
Car Repair Tips | Auto Repair Video Site


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Learn how to check your car’s transmission fluid with expert car tips in this free online automotive repair video clip.

Expert: William Myers
Contact: www.austinsubaru.com/en_US/
Bio: William Myers has been a Senior Master Technician for Subaru since 1998. He is an ASE Certified Master Technician and L1 Advanced Level Specialist.
Filmmaker: EV studios

Duration : 0:2:2

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Auto Repair Advice Online Manuals and Car Insurance Quotes
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Car Repair: Tips on Saving Money


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