How to change your oil

July 29, 2009

The Backyard Mechanics show how to perform a basic Oil Change

Duration : 0:5:17

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So then, why would you want to learn how to change your own cars oil? The simple and straight forward answer to this is because it will save you valuable time and money. No long waiting in queues at your local car service garage or oil changing shop. For around 10 dollars you are able to purchase a new oil filter and some quality oil for the engine.

Three easy steps are required when changing your cars oil:

1. Draining away the old oil.
2. Taking the old oil filter out and replacing it with a new one.
3. Placing the new oil into the engine.

To know when to go ahead and change your cars motor oil consult the manual for the car. What is typical is that manufacturers recommend that for a usual service you should change the oil every 6000 miles, every 3000 miles for a car that has been heavily used. Cleaning the cars engine of oil just before selling it increases your chance of the engine sounding at the very least satisfactory to any potential buyer, often even with over 100,000 miles on the clock! A great tip with oil changing is to make a change after a cars first 300 miles in it’s so called ‘break-in period’. Afterwards, changing the oil every 6000 miles is usually adequate.

As to what type of oil to use don’t go for the cheapest out there since this will simply mean your engine will wear out faster with use. The best oils to use are those that pass the American Petroleum Institute (API) classification SL. Pennzoil, Mobil, Quaker State, Havoline or Valvoline brands of oils are reliable, containing substances that prolong the life of an engine.

If just before winter you decide to change your oil a great lubricant to use is SAE 10W30 weight oil. This oils thin 10 weight viscosity is great for helping the car to start when in cold weather. Upon the engine warming up the viscosity increases to 30 weight providing a greater degree of protection. On the other hand, if you seek to replace the oil just before summer SAE 10W40 weight oil is better. This is heavier, at 40 weight, better protecting your engine in hot weather.

To begin with you need to allow the engine to get nice and cool. Modern day engines tend to run at about 300 F, at this temperature you are easily burnt by hot oil. If you feel you have the necessary protective outerwear then you could drive the car round the block until its engine has warmed up. This will mean the oil is thinner and so will drain out of the engine better.

Do this whole oil changing procedure on a nice and flat, firm area like a driveway or the road. Jack the car up, but make sure you use jack stands before you get under the car to locate find the oil drain. No Oil Change is worth even the slightest chance of death!

Step 1. To drain the remaining existing oil find the plug for the oil drain and turn it clockwise. The plug needs to be started with your fingers. If at all difficult to turn, don’t continue, turn a little the other way to stop crossing the threads. If you have time give the engine an our or so to let the last of the drops of dirty oil fall from the engine.

Step 2. Putting a new oil filter into the car involves initially placing the oil catch pan below the oil filter. With the aid of an oil filter wrench take out the filter.

Strap type oil filter wrenches are especially good for this task. Socket type oil filter tools are used with ratchets, as with a normal socket. One problem with this type of tool is it has the frustrating ability of getting stuck on the filter one time too many. Only use the socket type tool if not enough clearance exists around the filter for the more effective strap type tool.

Using your finger place a thin coating of motor oil upon the gasket of the new filter to improve its seal.

What follows is a very important set of rules that must be followed properly to avoid potential disaster.

Place the new filter into the car with your hands, stop turning if there is any minor difficulty experienced, take it out and try again carefully. As before, threads must not be allowed to cross. The majority of filters have instructions on them detailing that one further turn is applicable once in contact with the gasket.

Ensure the filter is screwed on so that it is hard to turn further with your hands. Using the oil filter wrench increase the torsion a little further by around 1/8 to 1/4 of a turn (very important).

A loosely fitted filter results in oil gushing our once the engine is started due to the high internal pressure exerted. If oil does appear you need to immediately turn off the engine otherwise it could be in danger of ceasing up literally within seconds.

Too tight a seal to the gasket and you may well end up with a seal that is hard to undo. In this case, if you have sufficient room about the filter you could possibly partially hammer a screwdriver or similar into the filter casing and body to then be able to push it round.

It is important to note that GM’s dual-overhead-cam EcoTec engine is unusual in that it has an oil filter positioned at the top of the engine. To remove the filter more easily you should remove the hose for the air intake. The oil filter canister sits below and on the right of the end of the open tube that intakes the air. The correct size wrench is required to take the canister lid off. Specific filter cartridges are used here.

Step 3. New oil must now be added to the engine. On the valve cover should be the oil filler cap, make sure that this is the correct cap! Then remove it, and start to pour the oil into the engine, via a funnel preferably.

The correct quantity of oil to add to the engine should be stated in the car manual. The majority of engines can take 4-5 quarts. Remember not to overfill the crank case. Excess oil may be blown through the PCV valve potentially causing the engine to stall, when the engine is started.

Place the oil filler cap back on securely.

Lastly, turn the engine on, keep watching the warning light for the oil to ensure that it turns off. No oil should be leaking from under the vehicle. Turn off the engine, wait for a minute so as to let the oil drain down to the crank case, then with the dip stick check the level of the oil.

Locate and pull the dip stick out, clean the measuring end with a cloth or other nearby absorptive material and place the stick right the way back into its sheath. Wait for a few seconds then take the stick back out to see the oil level. The oil level should be between the maximum and minimum oil levels marked on the measuring section of the stick, ideally 3/4 of the way up.

Try and recycle your used oil since it is illegal to dispose of improperly. Pour the collected oil into containers for easy transport to your local recycling unit.

There you go, you have now learnt one of the most significant ways of extending the life of your engine.

Alex Rider
http://www.articlesbase.com/automotive-articles/how-to-go-about-changing-your-cars-motor-oil-85508.html


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As a predictive maintenance tool, oil analysis is used to uncover, isolate and offer solutions for abnormal lubricant and machine conditions. These abnormalities, if left unchecked, usually result in extensive, sometimes catastrophic damage causing lost production, extensive repair costs, and even operator accidents.

The goal of a world-class oil analysis program is to increase the reliability and availability of your machinery, while minimizing maintenance costs associated with Oil Changeouts, labor, repairs and downtime. Accomplishing your goal takes time, training and patience. However, the results are dramatic and the documented savings in cost avoidance are significant.

What are Lubricants

Industrial oils are specifically designed fluids composed of a base oil and a compliment of additives. The base oil performs these functions, including forms a fluid film between moving parts in order to reduce friction and wear; carries away contaminants to the filter; and removes heat generated within the machine. Additives are chemical components added to the base oil to significantly enhance the performance characteristics of the lubricating oil. Typical enhanced properties include oxidation stability, wear protection, and corrosion inhibition.

Why Analyze Used Lubricants

There are three aspects of oil analysis, contaminants, lubricant conditions and machine wear. Ingressed contaminants from the surrounding environment in the form of air, dirt, water and process contamination are the leading cause of machine degradation and failure. Increased contamination alerts you to take action in order to save the oil and avoid unnecessary machine wear.

The assessment of the lubricant condition reveals whether the system fluid is healthy and fit for further service, or is ready for a change. Lastly, an unhealthy machine generates wear particles at an exponential rate. The detection and analysis of these particles assist in making critical maintenance decisions. Machine failure due to worn out components can be avoided. Remember, healthy and clean oil lead to the minimization of machine wear.

How Lube Oils Fail

Typically lubricant oils fail as a result of contamination, oil degradation and additive depletion. Contamination is usually caused by external sources like dirt, water, and process related liquids or materials or internal sources like machine wear and degradation by-products. Lubricant oils also fail because of oil degradation, or oxidation. It is where atmospheric oxygen combines with hydrocarbon molecules. The hotter the oil and the greater exposure to air, the faster oxidation proceeds. The initial by-products of oxidation are sludges and varnishes. However, further oxidation converts these by-products into carboxylic acids. These acids then aggressively attack and corrode many machine component surfaces. In addition, lube oils fail because of additive depletion, which are consumed or chemically changed while performing their function. The performance characteristics of the lubricant are altered and the enhanced properties are wiped out.

What Oil Analysis Measures

Oil analysis measures the physical and chemical properties of the oil, contamination and mechanical wear. You can uncover contamination or degradation by trending rates of change in selected lube properties, such as viscosity, acid number, particle counting, fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Karl Fischer water. Oil analysis also measures mechanical wear, which uncovers machine related problems using ICP spectroscopy, wear particle concentration, and analytical ferrography.

Michael Barrett
http://www.articlesbase.com/business-articles/the-practical-guide-to-oil-analysis-195730.html


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The Practical Guide to Oil Analysis
The Practical Guide to Oil Analysis
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Oil War

August 8, 2009

Video recap of the oil war in the Niger Delta of Nigeria

Duration : 10 min 47 sec

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I had a $10 off coupon at a Valvoline instant oil change figured I might as well use it. I had a full service oil change done with full synthetic oil (synpower 5W30) almost 5 quarts used. The total came up to $63.84 in Massachusetts. Is that normal for a full service oil change with full synthetic oil, I know thats top of the line oil but it just seems high. (Its a 97 awd eclipse gsx with 73k miles on it so trying to keep it in good condition)

Looking at the receipt, it says $37 for parts and $25 for labor. So what are people being charged for labor and parts when their Oil Change is only $20 bucks? Is Valvoline just expensive? The labor was higher because it was full service? Thanks.

I dont think I was necessarily cheated but I’m just not going to keep paying that kind of money for an oil change.

Figure that synthetic will be $20 to $25 added on top of whatever the price of the "normal" oil change costs, so $63 is entirely believable. Ironically, if you buy the oil yourself, they will probably only give you $2 or $3 off, but the saving is still worth it, if you are unable or unwilling to change oil yourself.


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How much does a full service oil change typically cost with full synthetic oil?
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http://www.WatchMojo.com takes a look at the safe and proper way to change your car’s motor oil.The following is for entertainment informational only, make sure to consult a professional.

Duration : 0:2:45

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For a repair shop, there is little profit in the $29.95 oil change. By the time a shop pays its technician, pays for the oil, the filter, and the hazardous waste disposal fees, there’s no money left.

This low profit margin is worsened by the extremely competitive “Quick Lube” business, which forces local repair shops to refrain from raising prices, despite rising costs.

This all begs the question: If Oil Change specials, which range from $15.95 to $29.95, clearly produce very low profits, then why do so many service facilities advertise oil change specials?

The answer is actually very simple: It gets you in the door. Service centers know that once they have your vehicle, they can sell you additional work.

Suggesting additional work is called upselling, and it’s a primary profit tactic of every service facility.

Here’s a typical example. You drop your vehicle off for “just an oil change.” Upon completion your service representative smiles and proudly states, “We noticed that your air filter was dirty; so we popped in a new one.” You may think “Great; what wonderful service!”

What really occurred is that you were casually upsold an air filter. It probably wasn’t needed; it certainly wasn’t replaced according to any factory recommendation, and you were definitely overcharged for what was most likely a poorly-fitting, aftermarket, inferior air filter.

Here’s a real-life example that occurred recently. This particular vehicle had 54,000 miles on it, and was dropped off at a local shop for “just an oil change.” Upon paying the bill, the customer was handed an estimate for $199 to replace his air filter and top radiator hose.

Shocked at the price, he called me.

After review, I found that the air filter suggestion was premature. It didn’t need replacement until the manufacturer’s recommended 60,000-mile service interval. The top hose was also premature. In fact, it did not need replacement at all, despite a very minor problem easily addressed during the factory maintenance scheduleat no extra cost.

Check out the aftermarket part prices quoted below (including the unnecessary radiator hose). Compare these to the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) for the factory OEM parts (Original Equipment Manufacturer).

Local Shop Aftermarket Air Filter: $32

Manufacturer OEM Filter, MSRP: $17

Local Shop Aftermarket Top Hose: $36

Manufacturer OEM Top Hose, MSRP: $19

Notice that this local shop was doubling the price of the OEM parts with its inferior aftermarket parts.

Now, let’s look at the labor time quoted.

Local Shop Labor Time: 2.0 $60 per hour = $120
<br />Manufacturer Labor Time: 0.9
$60 per hour = $81

Notice that the shop labor time estimate for the repairs was 2 hours. This is more than “twice” the manufacturer’s recommendations (even after calculating manufacturer times against the industry standard multiplier).

Had the local shop abided by the vehicle’s particular maintenance intervals instead of trying to make a quick buck, it should have recommended a 60,000-mile service at the next visit. This would have better served the client, saved him $199, and maintained the vehicle properly.

Instead, the service center lost a customer, forever!

What needs to be made crystal clear is that this type of price-gouging occurs every day in every type of service facility in one form or another across the automotive service industry.

This type of price-gouging is considered normal!

Theodore Olson
http://www.articlesbase.com/automotive-articles/car-repair-prices-why-your-oil-change-is-never-just-an-oil-change-62689.html


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Car Repair Prices: Why Your Oil Change Is Never "Just An Oil Change"
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I rarely drive my car, about 1000 miles a year. I bought it new in 2005 and it currently only has 8000 miles. It goes several months without being driven.

How often should I get an Oil Change?

The 3,000 Mile Oil Change MythBy Bill Siuru, Greencar.com provided by: According to a recent study by the California Integrated Waste Management Board, 73 percent of California drivers change their oil more frequently than required. This same scenario no doubt repeats itself across the country. Besides wasting money, this translates into unnecessary consumption of $100-a-barrel oil, much of it imported.
Using 2005 data, the Board estimates that Californians alone generate about 153.5 million gallons of waste oil annually, of which only about 60 percent is recycled. Used motor oil poses the greatest environmental risk of all automotive fluids because it is insoluble, persistent, and contains heavy metal and toxic chemicals. One gallon of used oil can foul the taste of one million gallons of water.
Article provided by GreenCar.com
Its been a misconception for years that engine oil should be changed every 3000 miles, even though most auto manufacturers now recommend oil changes at 5,000, 7,000, or even 10,000 mile intervals under normal driving conditions.
Greatly improved oils, including synthetic oils, coupled with better engines mean longer spans between oil changes without harming an engine. The 3000 mile interval is a carryover from days when engines used single-grade, non-detergent oils.
For several years, automakers like General Motors, BMW, and Mercedes-Benz have installed computerized systems that alert drivers via an instrument panel light when its time to change oil. As an example, the General Motor Oil Life System (GMOLS) analyzes the engine temperature, rpms, vehicle speeds, and other driving conditions to calculate the rate of engine oil degradation. Then, software calculates when the oil needs to be changed. Other systems work similarly.
Because of the many external conditions and parameters that have to be taken into account, calculating the precise maximum service interval using mathematical models alone is difficult. Now, Daimler AG has developed a more direct and precise way to monitor oil quality directly on board a vehicle.
Daimler uses a special sensor integrated into the oil circuit to monitor engine oil directly. Oil doesnt wear out, but rather dirt and impurities cause oil to lose its ability to lubricate properly, dictating the need for a change. Daimler uses the oils permittivity, that is, the ability to polarize in response to the electric field. If the engine oil is contaminated by water or soot particles, it polarizes to a greater extent and its permittivity increases.
To evaluate the quality of the oil, permittivity is measured by applying an AC potential between the interior and exterior pipes of an oil-filled sensor to determine how well the oil transmits the applied electric field.
Because not all impurities can be measured with sufficient precision via the electric field method, Daimler also measures the oils viscosity to detect any fuel that may have seeped into the oil. Daimler researchers measure viscosity while the vehicle is in motion by observing the oil’s side-to-side motion in the oil sump. The slower the oil moves, the higher its viscosity. This movement is registered by a sensor and the viscosity is calculated on this basis.
A single sensor, along with the information already monitored by on-board computers, is sufficient to determine the various parameters of the engine oil. Daimler will likely use the technology first on its commercial vehicles. Here, large oil reservoirs mean larger quantities of oil can be saved. Plus, a predicted 25 percent increase between service intervals and reduced downtime will be of interest to fleets, and thus justify the added cost of installation.


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OIL CHANGE: I rarely drive my car, about 1000 miles a year. How often should I get an oil change?
OIL CHANGE: I rarely drive my car, about 1000 miles a year. How often should I get an oil change?
Auto Maintenance Tips From Car Talk
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Free Auto Repairs advice and Tips call 0027118258252


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I got an Oil Change then when I got home I noticed there was smoke coming up from under the hood. I checked under the hood but can’t tell where the smoke is coming from. My brother said they probably just spilled some oil and it’s burning off. But this has never happened to me after an oil change. Could it really be just some spilled oil or could they have messed something up?

you should check that all of the caps to the oil, water, screenwash etc are firmly on because it could just be that a cap is off and as the engine heats liquid comes out of the top of the engine where it isnt sealed properly. if not it is proberly just some spilt oil or something.
also when it does it again check your engine temperature because if they have used the wrong oil, it may cause the engine to run too hot and therefore it wil smoke


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After your quick oil change service is completed, One of the first things that you want to check is that the oil is filled to its proper level. Each model vehicle may have a different oil capacity. Not all vehicles take 5 quarts of engine oil. For example, my 4.3 L engine in my blazer takes 4 1/2 quarts of oil. Any time I’ve ever had my Oil Changed by somebody else. They have overfilled the oil by a half-quart or more. Overfilling the engine oil is bad for the long-term health of your engine. If the engine oil is overfilled the oil may start to foam up. And this will diminish its lubricating properties. I have also seen the oil overfilled to the point where it starts to wash down the lower part of the cylinder walls.

The next thing you should check is that all the fluid levels in the engine compartment have been filled. Again, the quick lube center may rush to complete the operation and may skip filling vital fluids. A few things you should check are the windshield washer fluid level, coolant level in reservoir (never open when hot), power steering fluid level, transmission fluid level and brake fluid level.

Instructions for checking these separate fluid levels are included in your vehicles owners manual. If you should find that the fluid levels are not to their proper level. I am going to recommend that you return to the quick oil change center and have them fill the fluids for you. The first reason for this is that you paid for a complete service and you should receive a complete service. The second reason for this is you want to make sure that the correct fluids are being installed. The third reason for this is that the fluids will cost you money if you do it on your own and you already paid for this service.

Also check the tire pressure on all four tires? This again was supposed to be included in your oil change service. But it is important enough to double check to make sure that your tires are properly inflated. Under inflated tires can reduce fuel economy drastically and can be considered a safety concern.

The federal government has considered this so important that it has mandated that all new vehicles come with a tire pressure monitor system. Chances are your next vehicle will warn you when your tires are under inflated. But if your car does not have this system. It’s a good idea to purchase a tire pressure gauge and keep an eye on your pressure. The tire specification can be found usually on the doorjamb of the vehicle on the driver side or also in the owner’s manual. Under the tire section.

Mark Gittelman
http://www.articlesbase.com/automotive-articles/do-a-quality-check-after-your-quick-oil-change-service-128242.html


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